The Operator by Gretchen Berg

Just the cover of The Operator grabs me…the old rotary phone of my childhood kitchen (also actually my kitchen when we first moved into our home, and honestly, the wallpaper), the phone where you only needed to dial the last four numbers of your neighbor’s line because you shared an exchange. Simpler times. The Operator is a period piece taking

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The Unhoneymooners by Christina Lauren

Ready for a light read? Maybe a palette cleanser between thrillers or classics? The Unhoneymooners by writing team Christina Lauren might be just what you need. Ami and Olive are twins, and despite their twin language and many similarities, Ami seems to be the lucky one…she is about to marry Dane, she has a good job, and she has entered

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The Sin Eater by Megan Campisi

I had other books in my pile. I always do. This book called out to me to read it! In some ways, so unlike most of what I have been reading lately, but in other ways (debut novelist), everything I look for in a book-compelling, immersive, character driven, dark at times and somewhat genre defying. The narrator, 14-year old May,

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A Good Neighborhood by Therese Anne Fowler

I don’t suggest a book without feeling it is 100% worth the read; I suggest A Good Neighborhood. There are some caveats…and those caveats make this a good selection for a book group or to read and then lend to someone else in your quarantine circle. A Good Neighborhood is the story of two families in a North Carolina neighborhood

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The Far Field by Madhuri Vijay

Shalini, a privileged 20 something living in Bangelore is mourning the loss of her mother, and coming to terms with their complicated relationship. Recently let go from her job (a fact Shalini neglects to tell her father) she reminisces to the reader about a traveling salesman that used to visit their home while her father was at work. Shalini speculates

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The House of Trelawney by Hannah Rothschild

A little bit Schitt’s Creek and a little bit The Durrells in Corfu, The House of Trelawney is Hannah Rothschild’s sophomore novel, and it is a goodie! Remember the old don’t judge a book by it’s cover…I did just that. I saw this cover and said yes, I need to read this book. A UK story, a castle, royalty? I

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Nobody Will Tell You This But Me by Bess Kalb

My weekend listen: Nobody Will Tell You This But Me, written and read by the author, Bess Kalb. Bess is a TV writer and New Yorker contributer who adores her grandmother, Bobby, and is doted upon and adored by her grandmother. When Bobby dies at 90, Bess brings her back to life in this debut memoir, sharing stories, advice, humor

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The Missing American by Kwei Quartey

The Missing American is the start of a new female detective series, so yup, I’m in! Emma Djan wants to follow in her father’s footsteps as a homicide detective in the police department in Accra. She finishes her training, but ends up pushing papers on a beaurocratic treadmill, never getting the chance to get into the field. She applies for

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The Mercies by Kiran Millwood Hargrave

Changing the time period of my historical fiction reading up a bit, I journeyed back to Norway circa 1617 for a mythic novel, based on the 1617 storm and 1621 Witch Trials in Vardo. In this small settlement on the coast, a huge storm claims the lives of 40 men in their fishing boats, leaving a community of women with

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Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste NG

One benefit of all of this time at home is the opportunity to tackle my to read pile in earnest. Working at a library, I rarely buy books, but there are those occasions when I do, and Covid 19 has been an opportunity to create a little stock pile. The thing is…books I own do not have a due date,

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